Poem analysis miracles by walt whitman

Miracles by walt whitman figures of speech

To me the sea is a continual miracle; The fishes that swim—the rocks—the motion of the waves—the ships, with men in them, What stranger miracles are there? Who makes much of a miracle? Do you believe in miracles? Particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. He continues to describe what he views as miraculous. Besides human, speaker also pays attention to some animals. There are also many people in the ship. About Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, , and is widely considered one of America's most important poets. This speaker also finds miracles in the sun-down and the stars shining so quiet and bright, as well as the delicate, thin curve of the new moon in spring. His verse shows quite a bit of respect for humanity and nature. He emphasizes, "[e]very square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same.

Whether he associates with mechanics, boatmen, farmers or the fancy people who attend the opera, he still perceives all these people to be part of the great dramatic miracle of life. He then asks the question, "who makes much of a miracle?

miracles by walt whitman questions and answers

People may say why make much of miracle? So, the speaker feels exciting and be grateful for the creation of God.

Walt whitman poems

So, I could relate to this poem very well; it was like the poet read my mind. Besides human, speaker also pays attention to some animals. Walter "Walt" Whitman is an American poet and essayist. Reading of "Miracles" Commentary Whitman's speaker in "Miracle" is cataloguing all the miracles he finds as he goes through life, concluding that he has encountered nothing but miracles. Whitman also ever worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. To me the sea is a continual miracle; The fishes that swim—the rocks—the motion of the waves—the ships, with men in them, What stranger miracles are there? This stanza is intriguing because it parallels his valuation for the sky with his energy for other people he has spent time around. As a whole is a beautiful miracle too, but when you see each thing separately, they're other miraculous things also. He is just as excited to see people ride the subway cars looking at each other and smiling. Everything that is alive and breathing is a miracle for him, and the excellence and beauty of the stars that sparkle in the sky is also another wonderful enigma. Not only enjoy with someone who is known by the speaker, he also wonder with the strangers that he sees. The manmade miracles in the poem include the streets of Manhattan, skyscrapers of New York, beeches, love gossips, sitting around the dining table, subway car riding, etc.

Even the term appears to be defined in several ways. It represents objects, actions and ideas in such a way that it appeals to our physical senses. Walter "Walt" Whitman is an American poet and essayist. Also, he tries to address the opening question with his observation that the commonplace and conversation with someone he loves are miracles.

Poem analysis miracles by walt whitman

When he is walking down the streets of Manhattan, when he's seeing the sight of the roofs of houses toward the sky, when he's walking along the beach, when he's standing under a tree, when he's talking and sleeping with his loved one, when he's eating dinner with his family, when he's looking at strangers, when he's watching the busy honey-bees, when the animals feed in the fields, when the stars are shining so bright, when the beautiful crescent moon is on the sky, miracle is happening at every moment.

There are seven types of imagery, each corresponding to a sense, feeling, or action. Whitman frequently uses imagery in his poem to accomplish is goal.

Walt whitman multiple choice questions

Stanza 5 He continues to speak of humanity in the following stanza, and here, he speaks ironically of sickness. Not only in the land and in the air, but the speaker also wonder about life in the water. When he looks at his own eyes and figure in the glass, he searches for his life. Do you believe in miracles? Otherwise, he tried to discover something else for himself. Whitman also ever worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. Also, he tries to address the opening question with his observation that the commonplace and conversation with someone he loves are miracles. It does not matter, he asserts, "whether he is walk[ing] the streets of Manhattan or merely looking toward the sky," all he sees are miracles. Question No. His poetry presented an egalitarian view of the races. There is no rhyme scheme in the poem. The natural miracles mentioned in the poem include the buzz of honey bees, the sunset scenery, the shine of the stars, the delicate curve of the new moon, every hour of light and darkness, the inner swarms of the earth, fish, silent rocks and boats sailing in the seas. He says, To me, every hour of the light and dark is a miracle, Every cubic inch of space is a miracle Every square yard of the surface of the earth is spread with the same Every foot of the interior swarms with the same Every spear of grass-the frames, limbs, organs, of men and women and all that concerns them All these to me are unspeakably perfect miracles He expresses his belief that all of creation- every inch of it speaks of a creator and is therefore a miracle. He is just as excited to see people ride the subway cars looking at each other and smiling.

He is terrified by trees, the sky, the sea, creatures and most of all, mankind. Works Cited:. His poetry presented an egalitarian view of the races. It does not matter, he asserts, "whether he is walk[ing] the streets of Manhattan or merely looking toward the sky," all he sees are miracles.

The great city by walt whitman summary

People will be anxious about what this poem wants to tell about. There are also many people in the ship. He believes that what humankind has made, nature and human feeling are altogether wonders. Stanza 5 He continues to talk about humanity in this stanza, and here he incidentally talks about the ailment. Even sick people in hospitals, and the deceased headed for burial, he finds miraculous. He believes that mankind is of the utmost importance, and a large number of his different works also reveal this. Whitman's major work, Leaves of Grass, was first published in with his own money and, a total of copies were printed.
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Walt Whitman's "Miracles"